Signed and Numbered. 300 copies. 280 X 190 - 100 pp - 32 color photographs, 6 BW photographs, 2 engravings  : Editorial and graphic design : Arnaud Brunet & Rudy Nimsguerns / [neus] Print by Manufacture des Deux-Ponts ISBN: 979-10-92388-06-0

Signed and Numbered. 300 copies.
280 X 190 - 100 pp - 32 color photographs, 6 BW photographs, 2 engravings 
: Editorial and graphic design : Arnaud Brunet & Rudy Nimsguerns / [neus]
Print by Manufacture des Deux-Ponts ISBN: 979-10-92388-06-0

What is democracy? At this time of globalization, how is it perceived by our modern societies and by the media? In a world where the image is more of a conveyor of ideology, we can question ourselves about the role and the meaning of documentary photography. What does it show? What does it say?

The work of Baptiste Giroudon is the starting point of questionings about the way we perceive and comprehend politics through the medium of the image.

click to view the complete set of images in the archive

In political science as in art, morals and geometry, it is essential that truth be strictly distinguished from reality. (…)

As long as politics remains on a theoretical ground, it is a science which can be considered as exact as geometry in its definitions, as rigorous in its deductions. Just as in geometry, only absolute rights are considered. Consequently, political science operates on an idea and not on any form of reality (…). It shares another common trait with geometry in that it is not solely a satisfaction of the mind. Its goal is practical (…). One knows how the geometrician proceeds. First, he sets down his axioms and his definitions; he then deduces all propositions from the so-called definitions, using the above-mentioned axioms. The sequence of those propositions makes up the whole science of geometry. Ideal figures are the result of those definitions, and their diverse properties are demonstrated, without any concern about whether or not reality conforms exactly to this geometric truth established by definitions and theorems. Above all, the geometrician never tries to confirm through experiment such demonstrations which are based on abstract principles and preconceptions. (…)

I take reality for what it is worth, and I leave it to the statesmen’s judgement. Imperfections and miseries of real democracies, either past or modern, do not disprove definitions and deductions of democratic theory more than the irregularities and defects of concrete geometric figures disprove definitions and demonstrations of pure geometry. (…)

When confronted to the rough prejudices of imagination, philosophy could not repeat enough that in political science, as in morals or literature, reality is not equivalent to truth. It is at its best an imperfect sketch; it can even be its resounding negation.
— excerpt from the book “Democracy” by Etienne Vacherot. (1860)